Saturday, December 22, 2012

Imperfect Homeschooling and A Good College Fit

My original plan for homeschooling was to educate my kids with a top notch homeschool experience so they would be able to go where they wanted for college. I thought if I set up a great plan they may have a chance to attend an elite school. I also thought my kids would stand a chance at my husband's alma mater, now a top rated elite university with a very highly rated business school (which my husband attended).

The early years of homeschooling were great, the kids were compliant and were eager learners. I kept things light and fun yet they did great things and the things they learned were of high quality. My kids honestly don't think they know much but in casual conversation they can talk about topics which they think every kids knows but which shock adults. In my son's chemistry class this fall the teacher asked about a topic not yet discussed in class or in the text and my son answered and she was shocked and asked where he learned that. He learned it at MIT ESP Splash in an enjoyable class which he barely took notes on (and of course was never tested on and has no standardized test to prove he knows it). He remembered it more than a year later. My older son has also won some academic awards which I feel lend some credibility to the quality of his home education.

I don't blow sunshine up my kid's butts about their abilities. Honestly I don't really know how they stack up to other kids except the limited exposure I have to talking with other kids, but most kids are not even open to talking to an adult. I try to get information from some parents but most say they don't even know what their kids do in school, they just know the grades.

Sadly recently it has come to light that one son (with past LDs) thinks he is stupid (in every subject area) and the younger thinks he is just average. They also think we are living in the poverty income level, which is not true. We have kept our income level private as we don't feel it is something kids should know about, it's too personal and it's not something we want them discussing with their peers. We don't want them forming opinions about people in X income bracket are ___ and people in Y income bracket are ___. With that said I don't know how kids and teens form their perception of self and do not know why my kids don't know they have a great life compared to other kids.

It seems the college admissions criteria gets harder and harder and to be honest I don't know if either of my kids could ever get into my husband's alma mater. And I am starting to really not care.

The price of college is rising and rising and to be honest my husband and I are unsure if we are willing to pay that high a fee. Is it reasonable to spend $50K, $56K, $58K on one year's education? I don't think so. The second issue is, are we able to afford it? Having lived with no job then underemployment doesn't show up well on the financial aid forms because they don't ask those kinds of questions. The government thinks we're loaded but we can't pay for private college for one year for one kid on this income. Something is wrong with this picture. The colleges look at last year's income only and they have no clue about the last ten years and the roller coaster we've ridden financially. They don't know we lost two year's income on the sale of our house which we had to leave to move here so my husband could take this job. They don't know that the move cost $30K and how much we paid on a small rental plus the old mortgage and the property taxes in a vacant house. We don't want our kids graduating with ridiculously high student loans which equal many times their potential first year job's salary because we could not afford over $200K per child for college tuition.

Although my husband and I seemed to favor private colleges before, we are now opening our minds to state college. Dual credit is seeming better and better, especially since Texas has a generous policy that state colleges must accept all credits earned at accredited community colleges.

Suddenly "good enough" is seeming better than seeking "the best".

Most of all I want my kids in a college that is a good fit. I do not want them in a college that is too rigorous where they wind up depressed or suicidal. I want the academic load to be appropriate for their ability and a balance state of mind. If they want to do a college sport and are accepted on a team then that narrows the selection pool. If they need or want small classes we will look for that. If they want a giant state school we have options for those. If they want to go back to where it snows and rains and is cold and blustery they can do so, but to be honest they like these Texas winters where it is rarely in the 50s and is often in the 70s. Sun every day is fantastic for one's serotonin levels...

I always wanted our homeschool to prepare our kids for what they wanted to do with their career and to prepare for college if their plans required a college degree. I now want the best FIT for my kids not bragging rights or a brand name school to boost my own ego. I want my kids to thrive not just survive. I want my kids to feel they fit in, not that they are struggling and incapable.

Homeschooling is getting so hard now that I have two strong willed sons in grades 10 and 7. I no longer feel the need to be some kind of activist for homeschooling (which is why I currently hold no volunteer position in my local homeschool community). I also feel completely alone in this community because I have not been able to find like-minded homeschooling parents in my new area. Maybe this lack of support and encouragement is leading to my negativity about homeschooling. I no longer want to have my kids be poster kids for homeschooling. They are flawed as I am. I am feeling less and less capable and I am far from a perfect homeschooling mom. I am trying my best but maybe my best is not as good as I thought it could be.

Lately I have thought about quitting blogging as I worry that my blog is getting too negative or sounding to worrisome. However I am so stressed out and harried lately that I am not sure if I am confusing the negative thoughts and worries in my head with what I actually publish on the blog. Re-reading published posts is hard because I can read between my own lines to see something harsher or more negative about what I was thinking versus what readers may interpret. I have left more than a few blog posts unpublished due to them being either too negative or too personal.

I want my kids to have a decent education and I am also not sure if homeschooling is providing that. The family dynamics, the power struggles, and the battles are becoming too overwhelming. I am not sure that for my own physical and mental health that I should continue homeschooling. I am making some decisions over Christmas break, one or both may land in public school in January. If we do homeschool for the rest of this year I am very open to using school for fall of 2013 should that be the better choice for one or both of my kids.

I think I am burned out of homeschooling and life in general. I need a vacation but there is no vacation on the horizon, because all the extra money has gone to pay for out of pocket medical bills and educational supplies, tutor fees, and outsourced homeschool classes, and the move. And really both my husband and I could use new vehicles which I don't think we can afford.

Related Post from my archives: Teen Slacker Mentality and Phony Homeschool Moms

21 comments:

Ahermitt said...

I feel like I am over-commenting on your blog. If so, sorry.

I feel ya, and I am sorry for your stress and troubles. I just wanted to pass on two bits of information that may be useful to you.

1. Chances are, if you try to put the 10th grader in public school they will put him back to 9th grade. I just had a conversation with someone yesterday in that situation. The bad news is it could cause depression for the kid. The good news is that he gets a clean start.

2. My kids were very average, with exceptional abilities in one area each. That is really, all they need to get into a decent college. The trick is to take the test scores and search for colleges whose average SAT or ACT scores match. My kids are not going to Harvard, but decent private colleges. We are paying out of pocket $12 grand a year for one and (I'm guessing) $5 grand a year max for the other. This is due to merit scholarships, which most private schools offer.

Oh, and yes,... we've had the same financial situation as you described, but everyone thinks we are rich! ... that sucks.

Best of luck and I pray that your decision gives you some peace.

Deborah said...

I could have almost written this post. In our case, my husband had a midlife crisis and when we moved to Texas, he took a 1/5 cut in pay and also lost 1/2 tuition benefits for our children (up to about $20,000 per year for each child)...and my son slacked so heavily in his four years of public high school that I frankly did not think he would be able to succeed at UT Dallas (he got in on the basis of SATs)...so instead he went to the nearby tiny state school and it turned out to be a great fit and he has found a couple of mentors...he might easily have slipped through the cracks at a larger school. And yes, he is finally able to do well in math.

I think you have done a great job, and whether or not you choose to continue homeschooling, you've given your kids the kind of background they'll appreciate later (like my son now does).

ChristineMM said...

A Hermitt please don't stop commenting. I appreciate all of them.

Deborah, thanks for your compliments!

Bill Starr said...

Thank you for your blog and for this post. It sounds very honest and it's very important for any parent having similar thoughts to realize that they are not alone. Our three were home-schooled through high school since the oldest (now 23) was finishing second grade. So far, none have chosen college, but I think they are all capable of college-level learning, whether they do it for the credential, or do it for free with a library card or via the MIT online courses. I'm proud of they way each is conscientiously contributing to others through their places of employment.

My name is Tiffany said...

ChristineMM,

Yes, I think you are suffering from lack of homeschool support. Each year I go through phases when I seriously wonder if I am capable enough to homeschool all three of my boys. I often asked myself what was I thinking believing that I could orchestrate their education from K-12. I think it never ends. But when I get the chance to share my frustrations with other like minded individuals it always strengthens and encourages me to keep going.
Wishing you clarity during this Christmas break so that you can make the right choice for you and your boys.

Trace said...

I've been popping in to read your blog periodically over the last couple of years... there has been some absolutely amazing content on here...

I hope that this will be received in the spirit with which it is said though... I've long detected an emphasis on comparing your children to others.... I believe you even wrote a blog post at one time which explains why you believe this is a good thing.

I disagreed that sentiment then, and I disagree with it now.
What is one expected to DO with the information that you garner from comparing your situation with others? Either you are left with a feeling of smugness that you are ahead of the pack... or you are left with a feeling of inadequacy because you are behind the pack. Learning then cannot be appreciated for itself. It becomes a journey to get you someplace instead of being the destination itself....

THe fact that your children believe that being average is something negative is sad to me....

EVERYBODY is gifted at something. EVERYBODY is behind someone else at something.. EVERYBODY is average at something....

Being average is a gift to be grateful for.

I pray that you and your family take time over the holidays to recharge your batteries and that you make the decision that is best for you all. I pray that your children come to know that they've been absolutely blessed beyond belief that have a momma who was willing to invest in them as much you have - they have received an amazing education!

Be Blessed!! Your blog has been a blessing to many, including myself!

Trace xx

Amy @ Hope Is the Word said...

Christine,

I always appreciate reading your real-life struggles. This is NOT easy! I hope you get the rest you need soon.

Elisheva Hannah Levin said...

Christine,

I have said before that my son and I made the decision for him to go to high school, and at the time I thought it was the right decision. After what we went through with his high school education, I am no longer so sure. Every situation is different, of course, but the stress I dealt with regarding my son in high school was intense and ongoing. It was more work than homeschooling him was, because of his disability the difficulties I had getting the school to follow the IEP and keep me in the loop.

Although school may indeed be the right decision for you and for your sons, it is no walk in the park, especially for your son who has had health issues and learning issues. It is really important to be realistic about the amount of work that you will put in as a parent, even though your kids will be in school.

A suggestion: is there a way to take some time off formal "school" for a few weeks, even while homeschooling? Perhaps you all need to blow some steam before making any decision.

Finally, whatever decision you do make for each of the boys, I believe you will work to make it the best one. Although you may feel negative, I do not see it. What I see is a good mother grappling with what is best for each of her much-loved boys as they grown up. I see a family who has been through a major move and accompanying culture shift, and I know the difficulties you have faced and overcome. I hope you cut yourself some slack! I have greatly admired both your commitment and your honesty, even in areas where you and I do not agree.

Finally, let the college decisions wait for a while. Despite the drumbeat toward having everything decided posthaste that the schools and society in general indulges in, there are a lot of options, and decisions about them get easier as you all get closer to their transitions. FWIW, my son (19 on Friday) decided on community college in a trade area --welding and metal technology--and he loves it, although the transition has been an adventure.

I wish you all the best with your decisions, and your sons. I am sure that all shall be most well!

Happy Christmas and may we all be strengthened for the coming year!


ChristineMM said...

Thanks everyone for commenting! It helps to hear your feedback.

ChristineMM said...

Trace, Thanks for commenting.

My kids read my blog 1% of the time, or less.

The things I write about here when I speak frankly as if speaking to other homeschooling mothers are NOT the same things I talk about with my kids.

It is similar to talking with a mom about fear our children will be sexually molested by a pervert and wondering how to protect young children from such a terrible thing vs. when I talk to my kids about good touch vs. bad touch and privacy and boundaries with their bodies.

Although on the blog I compare and contrast and discuss homeschooling pedagogy and school and college American cultural topics, I do not do comparison talk with my kids.

The talks with my kids focus on their goals and what it will take to get to those goals.

I have not ever tried to pursuade my kids to only apply to or go to elite colleges. I just wanted them to have a great education and do what it takes to jump through hoops that colleges for their major will require. Engineering has certain requirements that an education major does not have, for example.

I am not one of those parents who pressures their kid to go to brand name colleges. I want a good fit. And we have to be able to afford the cost, and I don't want them to be burdened with too much student loan debt that they will have to pay back themselves. My husband and I had hoped that we could pay their way entirely but with private college at over $200K now that is probably not going to happen.

I myself attended a not a good fit college immediately after high school as it was the only one my father would agree that I could attend. He was footing part of the bill, not all of it, I paid some, as did my grandmother, and it was just $1500 for that year. I also worked 36 hours a week to pay for my car and gas and insurance since I had no choice but to be a commuter student.

I was hoping my kids would find a good fit and have an idea of what their major would be and find a good school for that major.

Lastly, of course I know that all people (kids included) have gifts in some areas, weak in others and average in others.

With that said it pains me to see a slacker teen wasting their gifts out of sheer laziness and also not applying themselves to their average areas and trying their hardest to not improve the weak areas. That's a mess. That is some of what is happening over here, much to my surprise and disappointment.

I have more respect for school teachers now than ever before. A good teacher cannot force a learner to learn if they are not engaged. What we are struggling with here is dis-engagement. And it sucks to live with day in and day out, 24/7.

Annie Kate said...

Here's a big hug to you. Kids are their own people, and moms are their own people, and we all have seasons.

I can identify with you in many ways but, despite the fact that hubby and I have PhD's we're not interested in the 'top' universities for undergrad, for both financial and educational reasons. It's better for most kids to have less stress, less debt, and to be able to be bigger fish in a smaller pond than would be possible at a top university.

And they don't even need to go to university as long as they are using some of their talents wisely and well. My oldest is taking her second year off after highschool, a much wiser option for her than attending university immediately.

But it seriously sounds like you need to offload some of the work and all of the worry and find something that inspires you, personally.

You could perhaps let your kids focus on things they want to learn for a while and just keep up with the basics in the rest of homeschooling.

I'd suggest you go surfing in positive places:

Subscribe to the Lee Binz's messages at The Home Scholar. She's always so positive about high school, and a lot of her stuff you can get free. Look at Barb at Harmony Art Mom. There's another source of inspiration. Read the Moore's book about successful homeschooling and get the boys to volunteer as well as learn.

Focus on life rather than school and just enjoy this time with your boys. Try to make it a win-win situation for all of you.

And have something you can do to distract yourself from the stresses of life. I blog, read, review, play organ, garden, exercise, and read aloud to the kids...and sometimes it takes all of these to keep me positive.

Even though I'm fully confident that God is in charge of my life, sometimes I need to work at staying grateful and happy and focused on reality.

This is my first time visiting your blog, and I hope I've been able to encourage you.

ChristineMM said...

Annie Kate, All my kids want to do is surf the internet, hang out on chat boards about video games, or start new video games (older son is now into World of Tanks not Minecraft). Younger quit Minecraft then picked it up again on this vacation time, and is sneaking it instead of the mere 1 hour of math I asked him to do. My kids seem to have addictive personalities.

My older wants to watch TV nonstop which he can do via Netflix, finding new series he never knew existed and watching them 8 hours a day...

If they had no sport team to go to they would be complete screen addicts...

They prefer their individual screen pursuits this year instead of family interactive pursuits. Very sad and weird to me.

This was the first year they didn't want to bake Christmas cookies with me.

I am reading a parenting book now and the older son seems to have hit puberty a bit late so his independence phase started at 14 and is in full swing at 15. My younger is hitting it early, it started right at the 12th birthday, so they are kind of going through the same "leave me alone to do my own thing and form my own identity phase" at the same exact time.

My younger is doing one interesting creative thing that I do not think is a pure waste of time. I guess. He is recording himself playing video games then dubbing in an audio as a tutorial then will upload to his new YouTube channel. He thinks he may earn money from it. I am skeptical. Whatever.

Melody Smith said...

Christine, I just found your blog while looking for information to get my teens involved in something, anything! My teen son is 16 and spends 24/7 in his room playing games on the computer. He does sometimes watch tv, such as the History channel. When I try to force him to go places with us he just complains the whole time.
I've found it impossible to find other teens to hang out with or co-ops. If I do find one or two it doesn't mean my son will click with that teen. I've been so frustrated and feel like I'm failing him but don't know how to get him to stop slacking off.
He never does his schoolwork and when I try to discuss goals he gets overwhelmed and feels like I'm looking down on him. He is very smart, loves computers and has so much potential!!
At this point it's too late for him to start high school and know he would hate it. He is very mature for his age and often doesn't relate to other boys his age.
My daughter is 13 and academics has never came easy to her. She likes to spend her time in her room listening to music, watching tv and daydreaming about boys. She doesn't have any homeschool friends since I've been unable to find other hs teens.
She also is not interested in dance or sports, therefore she doesn't meet other teens. I sense she is lonely and only has one life long friend she sees every other weekend.
I struggle with trying to find their interests and get them out of the house and engaged in life.
I'm at my wits end. I just don't know what to do!!
So I feel your pain and totally understand. I think about putting them in school but then worry about what kind of negative socialization they would be getting. Especially my daughter who is already boy crazed and would prob hang with the wrong crowd. I know I would lose her.
I feel better knowing I'm not alone. I also lack support since I can never find other parents of teens to talk to and learn from. All our local homeschoolers are elementary aged children.
I feel lost.
On a side note, my oldest is 20. I never did figure it out with him but he is also very bright and was more outgoing (had neighborhood friends). He is doing ok but could be doing better, he is also slacking off. ugh! He works for Fedex and was going to a local community college but lost his motivation. I've been pushing him to go back but then thought it would be more beneficial if he actual WANTS to go to college.
I just want my kids to have healthy, happy, successful(not struggling financially like their parents!) adult lives.

Melody Smith said...

Christine, I just found your blog while looking for information to get my teens involved in something, anything! My teen son is 16 and spends 24/7 in his room playing games on the computer. He does sometimes watch tv, such as the History channel. When I try to force him to go places with us he just complains the whole time.
I've found it impossible to find other teens to hang out with or co-ops. If I do find one or two it doesn't mean my son will click with that teen. I've been so frustrated and feel like I'm failing him but don't know how to get him to stop slacking off.
He never does his schoolwork and when I try to discuss goals he gets overwhelmed and feels like I'm looking down on him. He is very smart, loves computers and has so much potential!!
At this point it's too late for him to start high school and know he would hate it. He is very mature for his age and often doesn't relate to other boys his age.
My daughter is 13 and academics has never came easy to her. She likes to spend her time in her room listening to music, watching tv and daydreaming about boys. She doesn't have any homeschool friends since I've been unable to find other hs teens.
She also is not interested in dance or sports, therefore she doesn't meet other teens. I sense she is lonely and only has one life long friend she sees every other weekend.
I struggle with trying to find their interests and get them out of the house and engaged in life.
I'm at my wits end. I just don't know what to do!!
So I feel your pain and totally understand. I think about putting them in school but then worry about what kind of negative socialization they would be getting. Especially my daughter who is already boy crazed and would prob hang with the wrong crowd. I know I would lose her.
I feel better knowing I'm not alone. I also lack support since I can never find other parents of teens to talk to and learn from. All our local homeschoolers are elementary aged children.
I feel lost.
On a side note, my oldest is 20. I never did figure it out with him but he is also very bright and was more outgoing (had neighborhood friends). He is doing ok but could be doing better, he is also slacking off. ugh! He works for Fedex and was going to a local community college but lost his motivation. I've been pushing him to go back but then thought it would be more beneficial if he actual WANTS to go to college.
I just want my kids to have healthy, happy, successful(not struggling financially like their parents!) adult lives.

ChristineMM said...

Related post from my archives:
Teen Slacker Mentality and Phony Homeschool Moms

http://thethinkingmother.blogspot.com/2010/03/teen-slacker-mentality-and-phony.html

ChristineMM said...

I am presently reading a new nonfiction book Teach Your Children Well Parenting for Authentic Success by Madeline Levine PhD.

What it says about parenting teens is good for me to hear.

I plan to put some quotes on my blog soon. I am just finishing the chapter on the high school years and am reading it word for word, cover to cover. I'm over half way through it and love it.

She published The Price of Privilege 5 years ago but found that parents even in lower middle class families' kids suffered with the same things, it was not just rich kids as she suspected.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0061824747/ref=as_li_tf_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=thethinkingmo-20&linkCode=as2&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=0061824747

ChristineMM said...

Melody, I feel my kids are addicted to some of their games and online activity. I am strugging to get academics done. I am a stickler for making sure the state law requirements are being met. One thing I am doing is making sure we are not doing stupid schoolwork, it is all high quality and worthwhile, trying to get the maximum benefit out of the minimum effort.

However with what you said about self-isolation and the extreme gaming and not going out much and being alone a lot I would read about teen depression. There is a fine line between normal teen sulkiness and a clinical problem.

My younger goes back and forth about going to school and at present he is begging me to not go to school. I know he may find some close new friends there but he at least has 15+ hours a week 5x a week with the sport team and feels he is getting a lot of social contact, talking, laughing with the kids, even if they are all older than him by 1-4 years. At least they are a positive influence.

Good luck.

PS We still have the laptops banned from our kid's bedrooms.

You can put parental controls on to limit the time spent if you so desire. I blogged about that recently, with KidsWatch. The system works. (I get no pay for recommending them.)



ChristineMM said...

Melody, I feel my kids are addicted to some of their games and online activity. I am strugging to get academics done. I am a stickler for making sure the state law requirements are being met. One thing I am doing is making sure we are not doing stupid schoolwork, it is all high quality and worthwhile, trying to get the maximum benefit out of the minimum effort.

However with what you said about self-isolation and the extreme gaming and not going out much and being alone a lot I would read about teen depression. There is a fine line between normal teen sulkiness and a clinical problem.

My younger goes back and forth about going to school and at present he is begging me to not go to school. I know he may find some close new friends there but he at least has 15+ hours a week 5x a week with the sport team and feels he is getting a lot of social contact, talking, laughing with the kids, even if they are all older than him by 1-4 years. At least they are a positive influence.

Good luck.

PS We still have the laptops banned from our kid's bedrooms.

You can put parental controls on to limit the time spent if you so desire. I blogged about that recently, with KidsWatch. The system works. (I get no pay for recommending them.)



ChristineMM said...

Received via email from a friend whose kids are college senior, college freshman and high school sophomore homeschooled all or most of their lives....who never leaves direct blog comments...

Just read your blog titled Imperfect homeschooling and a good College fit… hang in there. Call me this week when we can get a good chat in.

I think you need to keep blogging whether or not they go to school.

Many out there need your voice of honesty. I have a low "negativity threshold" and what you write strikes me as HONEST, not negative. Don't mix up the two. I know what you are up against, and my heart is with you all the way through this. Looking forward to chatting soon…

Fatcat said...

I think maybe it's time to sit down and have one of those 'this is not working for me' talks with your boys. They might need some screen time limits. They are not entitled to all the screen time they want. They need to get their school work done first. Their dad may need to get involved in this, because amongst my friends, I've seen many teen boy rebellions against being taught by their mom. ONe switched to Dad doing the teaching, one switched to big brother doing the teaching, the others have just muddled through. I don't think public school is the best answer. If I were leaning in that direction, I might try one of the on line schools first. Is that free one available where you are, what's it called, K12?

My youngest is now 14 and he is going through that wanting to be alone phase and since he doesn't have screen time during the day, he ends up going outside a lot.

It's time for mom and dad to team up and address this. I wish you the best. We've been homeschooling for 8 years now (maybe 9?) and we've had a lot of team meetings over the years, to say 'this is not working' and "how should we proceed?"

Good luck!

Janet Sedano said...

Christine, I appreciate your honesty.
One of the reasons we chose to homeschool was to teach them godly character. Then the teen years came and it got real hard. Teens want to be more independent and often times go about it the wrong way.
A good book I can recommend for these tough years is Age of Opportunity, by Paul David Tripp. Excellent book!

We have Netflix, also. But the TV doesn't go on during the day. Can you cancel the subscription until you see that they can handle it?
With my son, I had to take the Xbox games and controllers away for a few weeks. I told my son that it was stealing his time, he was not showing self control. As his parents, we would be failing him to allow him to have something that was causing more harm than good. I just gave them back to him last week, but he knows it is his choice whether he loses them again. He can make a wise choice or a foolish one. And he has seen the fruit of this with his sister, who for some time lost a lot of privileges. Now she has more freedoms than he does because she has proven herself trustworthy.
It's a lot of work! A lot of prayer!! It took a lot of late night talks. Going in their rooms and talking and sharing scripture and sharing stories. My son has a long way to go, but he has come a long way since he lost his privileges a couple of months ago. Our kids are getting a better understanding that if "you are faithful in little things, you will be faithful in large ones. (Luke 16:10)
As to homeschooling, my son needs to be challenged. He gets bored easily. Public school is not an option I wanted to consider; private school is expensive and not much different....so what we have done is joined Classical Conversations. He goes to 'school' once a week to a class with about 8 other homeschoolers and gets all his assignments for all his subjects for the rest of the week. Their classes are very challenging. They have groups in Texas, too, if you want to look into it. I sit in the class sometimes and I always make sure the work is getting done.
I'm sorry this was so long...one last thing I want to share that may be helpful is this website where I have found so much help for highschool through articles and their forums (forums for teens too). LetsHomeschoolHighSchool.com

Please don't stop blogging. Your blog is so 'real' and honest! Refreshing. I pray you find your way to the best choice for your family.