Wednesday, October 19, 2011

Chaga



Something I've learned about through my autodidact pursuit about learning about trees is what chaga is. Here is a photo of young chaga on a birch tree in my Connecticut woods. I took the photo in December 2007 but didn't know what it was until a few months ago. I was curious about it back then but never took the time to figure it out until this year. Chaga has medicinal properties and has been used by people around the world for thousands of years. I have not yet wildcrafted chaga myself or used store bought chaga.

9 comments:

Xa Lynn said...

I never knew what those were. Now I'm going to see them everywhere...

Xa Lynn

Nurjihan said...

Hello,
I am trying to find the page where you list all the resources you use for your subjects. I am not very internet savy. I love your blog. I am in my first year of homeschooling my 7th grader.
Thank you so much for your time.

ChristineMM said...

Hi Nurjihan,
If you mean what resources I am using this year for my 6th grader here is that blog post.

http://thethinkingmother.blogspot.com/2011/09/grade-6-sons-homeschool-plan-2011-to.html

I didn't publish my grade 9 son's but maybe I should write it up.

Also these wind up changing as the year goes on. My 6th grader has stopped Teaching Textbooks 7 and started Khan Academy this month, for example.

LMK if this is what you wanted.

Mack said...

I’m sure it gave you personal satisfaction to discover something really good just within your means. Chaga doesn’t only look as a useful matter on the outside. But lies inside are a lot of medicinal benefits just waiting to be boiled, eh? :D Have you tried making some tea with it?

Mack Shepperson

ChristineMM said...

Hi Mack,
I didn't do anything with the chaga because by the time I identified what was in the photo (which I'd taken months earlier) I had already moved from CT to TX. This was on my property in CT.

Also a week after this blog post was published we had a freak snowstorm in CT in October which killed many trees since they still had leaves on them at the time of the heavy snowfall. This tree was killed in that storm. When I returned to the tree in 2012 it was dead. I do not know if taking chaga from a now-dead tree is safe. Do you know?

In any event the property sold and I no longer have access to the dead tree.

feelgoodtime said...

Here you can find everything about Chaga Mushroom Benefits and Side Effects.

Ray Garcia said...

hello christine. name is Ray. i live in connecticut and just heard about chaga. so i was wondering if we had any here in connecticut, but i guess you answered my question. i will be searching for some. did you live in the northern part of connecticut? i am in southeastern conn, and im hoping the chaga mushroom grows around here. ill be looking :) gotta have it

ChristineMM said...

I lived near Fairfield. It is all over CT and New England wherever birches are. Go hiking and you will find it! YOu should look into some guided foraging hikes such as with local wild mushroom clubs or Wildman Steve Brill. Enjoy the learning journey!

Alana Shaikh said...

Chaga mushroom also known as inonotus obliquus in scientific terms is a mushroom that grows on birch trees. Unlike other mushrooms that draw heir nutrients from the soil, this mushroom draws its nutrients from the birch tree. Other than drawing its nutrients from trees, another unique feature of this mushroom is that it’s usually hard instead of soft like other mushrooms. The insides of chaga have the color of rusted iron and the veins are cream-colored. The texture of the mushroom is cork-like and it has a charcoal-like appearance.